A SIMPLE WALL HANGING DIY

A SIMPLE WALL HANGING DIY - This Wild Home

I’ve had some requests for this wall hanging throughout the year so I am FINALLY sharing how I made it!

It’s a fairly simple design. I’m not great with knots, but I had some thick yarn lying around and no plan for what to do with it, so I grabbed a wooden dowel from the store and went to town!

A SIMPLE WALL HANGING DIY

A SIMPLE WALL HANGING DIY - This Wild Home

WHAT YOU NEED

  • 3 rolls of chunky yarn (mine is really old but this looks similar)

  • 4 ft wooden dowel (or just a stick you found in the yard)

  • Measuring tape

  • Scissors

  • Twine

HOW TO

A SIMPLE WALL HANGING DIY - This Wild Home
  1. Cut 10 79 inch strings, 20 58 inch strings, and 20 37 inch strings.

  2. Starting in the very center of the dowel, tie the 79 inch strings (with the knot shown above) onto dowel. Work your way from the center outwards by tying the string alternating from the left to right side of center string.

  3. Tie 10 58 inch strings on the right side of 79 inch strings and 10 58 inch string on the left side of 79 inch strings.

  4. Tie 10 37 inch strings on the right side of 58 inch strings and 10 37 inch string on the left side of 58 inch strings.

  5. Grab your twine and tie on either side of dowel to desired length.

A SIMPLE WALL HANGING DIY - This Wild Home
A SIMPLE WALL HANGING DIY - This Wild Home

And there you have it! All the measuring and tying is a little time consuming, but it can definitely be done in a day and then you have this wonderfully minimal wall hanging for where ever you choose.

SAVE FOR LATER

A MINIMALIST DESIGN YARN WALL HANGING: A DIY tutorial to make your own - This Wild Home
A MINIMALIST DESIGN YARN WALL HANGING: A DIY tutorial to make your own - This Wild Home
A MINIMALIST DESIGN YARN WALL HANGING: A DIY tutorial to make your own - This Wild Home

A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THRIFTING

A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THRIFTING + a list of places you can go - This Wild Home

I’ve always loved thrifting. From the vintage dresses I wore to my homeschool proms to the over sized sweaters that were already worn in from decades of use. Even the smell of the old clothes that’ve been sitting in the back of a closet for years brings a little flutter to my stomach because it’s the smell that say, “There’s a gem in here somewhere.”

WHY CHOOSE SECOND HAND?

A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THRIFTING - This Wild Home.
A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THRIFTING - This Wild Home.

Besides being an extremely rewarding pastime, thrifting is very budget friendly. With our debt, I try as much as possible to only buy the essentials, but every once in a while, I’ll want to buy something nice for myself. This is a way I can do something for myself, do something for the planet, and not completely break my budget.

As I’ve learned more about the world and life and where my values really lie, I’ve found the value in thrifting more than ever. I’ve struggled with the balance between quality goods vs budget items, my impact on the world and the people around me, and finding a way to be a more responsible consumer. That’s why my love for thrifting has surfaced now more than ever.

The more research I do on the world of sustainable and ethical fashion, the more I realize new is not always better. Even new from high quality, sustainable, and ethical brands; it’s not always the way to go.

No matter what, it’s still adding more stuff to a world that is already full of perfectly fine clothing, if you know how to find it.

A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THRIFTING - This Wild Home.

When you shop second hand, it’s simply recycling goods that are already in existence. It’s not giving anyone a reason to make more. You’re not promoting fast changing trends or poorly made clothing. You’re simply promoting the reuse of products that were made, used, and put back into the world to be used again.

It’s not always easy. The good stuff isn’t always on display or on it’s own special rack. Most of the time, it’s hiding away. Waiting patiently for someone to find it and appreciate it for all it’s worth.

When you take the time to look through the packed racks, there’s no telling what you may find.

HOW TO SHOP AT THRIFT STORES

A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THRIFTING - This Wild Home.
A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THRIFTING - This Wild Home.
  • KNOW WHERE TO GO | Beyond just the shop itself, knowing the areas in your town can affect the quality and style of the goods in the shop. Going to second hand shops in nicer areas, while maybe effecting the price by a few dollars, is usually a good way to find newer and high quality items. Definitely look for second hand shops in swanky areas to really strike gold.

  • DON’T FOCUS ON LABELS | This one gets me every time. I’ll be browsing the isles and see something that I know was once an expensive, quality item and I’ll think, “I have to get this.” Whether I need it or not, I’ll put it in the cart and never wear it. It’ll sit in my closet and eventually find it’s way back to the racks of a thrift store.

    Whether you’re avoiding clothes because it doesn’t have the right label or you’re buying clothes just for the label, you’re really limiting yourself. Unless you are a buying specific finds to resell in a store, the labels don’t matter. Whether you like the item or not should be the only thing you focus on. If you happen to like something with a nice label, that’s awesome! But it shouldn’t be a deal breaker.

  • DON’T GET STUCK ON SIZES | There are so many reasons why. To start, older clothing sizes are different than modern sizes. Different brands have different size standards. Older clothes can get stretched out or shrink. Sometimes bigger sizes are just more cozy. Plus, the racks aren’t always organized very well so smaller sizes may make their way to larger size sections and vice-versa.

    I don’t like to limit myself to just one size section. It really makes your options slim and you may miss out on items you could really love. Look through all the sizes and if you’re not sure about something, try it on.

  • KEEP A FRUGAL MENTALITY | When everything is $5 or less, it’s easy to say, “eh, if I don’t like it I’ll just give it back.”

    Overtime, $5 really adds up and if you’re not a little stingy, you may wind up coming home with a pile of clothes that you really don’t need/like just because price wasn’t a big issue.

    If you’re not sure about something, try it on. If you don’t need it, don’t get it. If it’s not your style, leave it at the store.

    Thrift stores shouldn’t be treated as a free for all just because it’s a little less expensive. Sure, you may not necessarily be adding waste into the world when you bring it back, but why waste your money, even just $5 of it, on something you don’t love?

  • GO WITH A PLAN | Along with your frugal mentality, it’s important to have a plan. Going thrifting just for the sake of thrifting is better than shopping fast fashion just for the sake of shopping, but it’s still not going to do you any favors. Taking stuff home just because it’s cheap and doesn’t break the bank isn’t a great reason to take something home.

    Before thrifting, I like to know what I need. I like to have an idea of items and colors I’m looking for. It not only saves money, but it’ll saves time in the long run.

    If I know I need sweaters, then I can just look at the sweaters. If I need a few different types of items, I can at least know colors to avoid. Bright colors and really any shade of red are not for me, so I know I don’t need to look at anything in those colors.

    Knowing the gaps in your wardrobe that you’re trying to fill will be helpful in keeping you on track with what you need.

  • GIVE YOURSELF TIME | This is the golden rule of thrifting. It takes time. Sometimes a lot of it. When I go thrifting, I leave my kids at home with dad to avoid distractions and an impatient baby clock. I make sure I don’t have a ton to do. I go during nap time so I don’t feel like I have to rush back to help. I do whatever I need to do to avoid feeling rushed.

    The racks of thrift stores are full, and often a little all over the place. There’s stuff hiding behind other stuff, things aren’t always organized neatly, and you really just don’t know what is there unless you give yourself the time to sort through the racks.

WHERE TO SHOP

  • A lot of towns will have local second hand shops. Looking out for those will hit the mark of second hand, reused, shopping small, and shopping local. Definitely a good choice if you have the option!

  • Goodwill is one that I like. There are some questions surrounding their operations and wages, but from what I’ve found, they really make a point to hire people who would otherwise struggle to find jobs and while their hourly wages may be less sometimes, they get compensated in a lot of other ways with benefits that cater to their specific health and wellness needs.

  • Facebook marketplace, craigslist, and eBay are good options! You have to be a little more careful about who you’re trusting, but you can find some really good stuff for a discount.

  • Apps like poshmark and thredup are good online sources as well. I like stuff like this because you’re directly helping an individual and these two are a little more heavily vetted so you can trust you’ll get what you’re paying for.

SAVE FOR LATER

A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THRIFTING - This Wild Home.
A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THRIFTING + a list of places you can go - This Wild Home
A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THRIFTING + A FREE PRINTABLE PLANNER- This Wild Home

HOW TO BUILD A FALL CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR KIDS

HOW TO BUILD A FALL CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR KIDS - This Wild Home

Now that it’s starting to cool down here in North Texas, I finally got around to buying both boys some fall clothes.

Honestly, most of the time we’re at home, the boys are just in diapers (at most) so we don’t have a big need for large amounts of clothes. That, on top of the fact that we’ll be in an airstream in the next few months, means we need to keep their clothes to a minimum.

WHY HAVE A SEASONAL CAPSULE WARDROBE?

When it comes to kids and their clothes, the idea of a capsule wardrobe seems silly at first. It sounds like such a fancy, adult term that only those who can buy the best of the best should really participate in.

In my opinion, kids are the ones who really need a capsule wardrobe. They grow so quickly that by the next season, they need a whole new set of clothing.

Traditionally, a capsule wardrobe is meant to last long term. It’s meant to have high quality items that could potentially last a lifetime. For a kid’s capsule wardrobe, I think of it as challenging yourself to buy as little as possible because you know they’ll outgrow it by next year.

When you think in terms of “capsule wardrobes,” you’re already in the mindset of less. You can put on some critical goggles when deciding what your children really need in their wardrobe.

HOW TO BUILD A FALL CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR KIDS - This Wild Home

HOW TO BUILD A CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR KIDS

I think everyone has different needs for their wardrobes. Numbers really can’t be suggested because what works for us may not work for you. Kids have so many variables that effect how many clothes they need.

So rather than tell you a number or give you a list of “essentials,” I’m just going to give you some things to think about as you plan their seasonal wardrobes.

THINGS TO CONSIDER:

  • ARE THEY MESSY EATERS (or messy in general)? | I basically undress my kids for every meal we eat at home. They just can’t help but get food on their clothes and I don’t want to stress the whole meal about how clean or messy they’re getting. I just want to hand them some food and let them figure out how to get it from the plate to their mouths - sauce dripping down their stomachs and all.

    If you have messy kids (lets face it, who doesn’t?) and you don’t always have the desire/ability to dress or undress them, they’ll probably need more clothes for changes throughout the day. Really, they’ll probably need some clothes that aren’t super nice so you don’t have to stress about how much their shirt cost when they walk through the door covered in mud.

  • IT’S OKAY IF THEY WEAR THE SAME THING ALL THE TIME | I think variety is something that’s easy to stress about. If people see your kids in the same clothes all the time, will they think you’re lazy? Will they wonder if you’re poor? Will they worry you’re not providing your kids with the best you can?

    Honestly, anyone who would think that based on how often your kid wears a shirt was probably going to think that no matter what. Most likely though, I’m sure there are very few people who really notice what your kid is wearing. The important thing is, do your kids like their clothes?

  • SIZE UP | Something I know about babies (which is my youngest) is that they grow ridiculously fast. I feel like he’s a new size every month and it’s hard for me to justify buying him nice clothes that he’s only going to wear for a little while. So I sized up his clothes! By the time the weather is really cold and his fall clothes become essential layers, they should fit nice and snug. If he has to look like Harry Potter under the stairwell for a bit, so be it!

  • KEEP IT COMFY | Of course, this is totally based on your own activities and taste, but for me personally, I like to give my kids comfy clothes. I tried the whole stiff jeans and button up shirts thing with Ollie when he was little and he just seemed stuck. He couldn’t climb the way he wanted to or move as effectively. He just seemed uncomfortable. Now, I try to buy him mostly knit wear. Loose, breathable stuff. He seems so much more confident in his movements and he looks more comfortable in general.

PLANNING THE WARDROBE

The actual planning of a wardrobe is what gets overwhelming for me. There are so many choices out there and I right before I pull the trigger on a purchase, I worry if I’ve actually considered all my option or that maybe something cuter will come around soon.

So I simplified this by getting practical. There are a few things you can think about when deciding what your kids really need in their wardrobe. Thinking through these things can help narrow your options and help to simplify your decision making.

  • THINK ABOUT YOUR WEEK | Do your kids go to school? Do they play sports? Do they run around naked all the time like mine? What kind of outings do they need to dress for? Kids who have activities to go to will probably need more than kids who stay home. This is also helpful in determining what kind of clothes they’ll need. A sports kid will probably need more athletic wear than a kid who does art classes.

    Besides just thinking about there personal style, their weekly activities effect the type and amount of clothes they’ll need.

  • THINK ABOUT THE WEATHER | Obviously, weather is a key player. Right now, we don’t really need coats, just sweaters and good layers. Other places, you may just need one pair of pants and a bunch of shorts year round.

    Think about your climate, when the weather will actually start to change, how drastically it will change, any trips you may take, any activities you’ll do, and plan accordingly.

  • HOW OFTEN DO YOU WANT TO DO LAUNDRY | Along with that whole messy thing, they will go through lots of laundry. Personally, I don’t mind doing laundry often so I only need enough clothes to get us through about 2 days.

    Think about your laundry routine and make sure you’re taking into account how often an amount of clothes will need to be laundered.

  • STICK TO A COLOR PALETTE | I like having my boys wear colors. It’s just fun. I’ve seen others who don’t let any pigment into their wardrobe and that looks great too. Whatever you do, make sure everything goes with everything. If you have multiple kids, why not give them the same color palette to work with? They will always look like they go together!

    When considering a color palette, I like to pick three colors that all look good together and pick out items that all fit in that range.

    Blue is a personal favorite because it feels like a neutral that’s still fun. It basically goes with everything.

To keep all of these thoughts in one place, I’ve made a free printable for you to hide you through the planning!

Screen Shot 2019-10-06 at 11.59.53 AM.png

PLAN THEIR WARDROBE

OUR KID’S WARDROBE

We have two capsules: one for the toddler and one for the baby. Though, I did make them fairly similar because I’m obsessed with aesthetics and gotta keep the gram feed consistent.

When putting together their wardrobes, I knew I wanted actual colors (blue, yellow, pink*ish/red) and I knew I wanted everything to be comfy. Our weather is a bit all over the place so I needed clothing that could keep them warm but also cool at the same time, so layers.

I also thought through what clothing we go through the fastest in a week. Shirts were definitely something we needed more of because, well, they just don’t wear pants all that often and when they do they don’t get too dirty.

I wound up getting them both clothes that were one size bigger than what they are currently wearing. Yes, they look a little Harry Potter under the staircase right now, but I’m thinking when we get the real cold weather here, their clothes will fit perfect!

I’m also able to combine their summer capsules with their fall capsules which basically means very fitted shorts with loose long sleeves. I don’t look like a TOTAL Petunia Dursley quite yet. (Now I’m in the mood for a Harry Potter binge)

My strategy here is, buy them a new, minimal wardrobe and if they wind up with gaps or they grow out of something, it will be thrifted until next season. This way, I can have some really nice items for them that I can make sure we all love, but I don’t have to break the bank or stress too much about making sure they have EVERYTHING on the front end.

THE TODDLER

HOW TO BUILD A FALL CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR KIDS - This Wild Home

For Ollie’s wardrobe, we already had shorts, t-shirts, shoes, and a jacket, so my main focus were pants and long sleeves. We will probably put away the shorts and t-shirts soon which will leave him with just what you see here to get through fall.

A FALL CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR A TODDLER - This Wild Home
HOW TO BUILD A FALL CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR KIDS - This Wild Home

For Charlie, we had a few t-shirt and jacket hand-me-downs from Ollie, but I don’t want him to get the classic little brother curse of having ONLY hand-me-downs, so he got some of his own stuff!

For the most part, this is all he’ll be wearing this fall and then I’ll probably grab him some shoes when he starts crawling and a heavier coat when the temperatures drop.

A FALL CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR BABY - This Wild Home
HOW TO BUILD A FALL CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR KIDS - This Wild Home
HOW TO BUILD A FALL CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR KIDS + A FREE PRINTABLE PLANNER- This Wild Home
HOW TO BUILD A FALL CAPSULE WARDROBE FOR KIDS + A FREE PRINTABLE PLANNER- This Wild Home